Should Gaming Be Regulated? Parliament Wants Your Thoughts

Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Committee latest inquiry will investigate 'links between gaming and gambling'

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Should Gaming Be Regulated? Parliament Wants Your Thoughts

Should Gaming Be Regulated? Parliament Wants Your Thoughts

While most Government ministers are focused on Brexit, the good people of the Digital, Culture, Media and Sports Committee (DCMS) have been able to look past those squabbles to push forward with other government business, hoping to move forward with their “addictive technologies inquiry“, which launched in December.

Like we said above originally announced back in December, the inquiry seeks to “look at how the addictive nature of some technologies can affect users’ engagement with gaming and social media, particularly amongst younger people”. This could eventually inform government policy on the regulation of gaming, and help government “keep pace with the increasing digitisation and ‘gamification’ of people’s lives”.

Now the government has called upon the UK’s “gamers, game designers and experts” to ask “should gaming be regulated”, allowing written submissions to be sent to the enquirers provided that they are written in the correct form and address the topics at hand. The inquiry covers the following topics.

– The immersive media industry
– The future of eSports in the UK
– The wider uses of “gamification” and VR/AR
– Tackling digital and gaming addiction
– The links between gaming and gambling
– Data security and infrastructure

As of yesterday, individual members of the public and organizations can now enter written submissions to the inquiry. If you want to write something yourself, make sure to read the terms of reference beforehand for information on the topics being addressed. Written evidence should have numbered paragraphs and be under 3000 words in length.

This inquiry comes as a result of increased international scrutiny of the video game industry, honing in on their addictive properties and how they can be exploited for the monetary gain of their developers and publishers. Many gamers will know these criticisms as the “loot box” controversy.

More information about the DCMS’ “Immersive and addictive technologies inquiry” on the UK’s Parliament website.